Hi, the name is J. I'm 22, from the UK, originally from Malta. This blog is all about humour and madness, with a little bit of serious talk on the side :) Welcome to Sparta! Feel free to say hello!

My tastes change constantly but expect lots of Bioshock, Assassin's Creed, Game of Thrones and Lost Girl.

LGBTQA friendly and a lover of... woman.

 

When I was a student at Cambridge I remember an anthropology professor holding up a picture of a bone with 28 incisions carved in it. “This is often considered to be man’s first attempt at a calendar” she explained. She paused as we dutifully wrote this down. ‘My question to you is this – what man needs to mark 28 days? I would suggest to you that this is woman’s first attempt at a calendar.’ It was a moment that changed my life. In that second I stopped to question almost everything I had been taught about the past. How often had I overlooked women’s contributions?

Sandi Toksvig (via tomfjord, learninglog)  (via sleepywriter08) (via blue2period)

I think it’s a social responsibility. I think it’s OUR responsibility to stand up and say what we want and what we don’t want. […] When they announced that Falcon was going to be Cap in the comic books, the internet went crazy. ‘Marvel and their liberal… stupid… I’m tired… Thor’s a woman and she’s stupid.’ But the first Cap was a black dude, like the Tuskegee Airmen. And, before this, the Falcon was Cap once before. So now for you to say ‘Oh they made him black because of Obama’? Dude, you have no idea what you’re talking about. And I feel like that kind of ridiculousness is what is holding us back as a group of people who are trying to create something great in the name of art.

Anthony Mackie (x), when asked about pushing for more diversity

I couldn’t quite hear everything he said in the internet troll voice. But this was the gist.

(via wintesoldieriscoming)

I think the saddest people always try their hardest to make people happy

because they know what it’s like to feel absolutely worthless

and they don’t want anyone else to feel like that.

Robin Williams (via rihahna)

(Source: skateeofmind)

Being born a woman is an awful tragedy. Yes, my consuming desire to mingle with road crews, sailors and soldiers, bar room regulars—to be a part of a scene, anonymous, listening, recording—all is spoiled by the fact that I am a girl, a female always in danger of assault and battery. My consuming interest in men and their lives is often misconstrued as a desire to seduce them, or as an invitation to intimacy. Yet, God, I want to talk to everybody I can as deeply as I can. I want to be able to sleep in an open field, to travel west, to walk freely at night.

Sylvia Plath

fuck every single time that last line gets quoted without the rest

(via sadjailbait)

(Source: raccoonwounds)

In 1950, when I was 8 to 9 years old, I saw my father cry, it was the only time I’ve ever seen him cry, I asked him ‘why are you crying?’, he said to me ‘Brazil lost the World Cup’ so I said to him “don’t worry dad, I will win you a World Cup”. I won three.

Pelé (via torreos)

(Source: rickardokaka)

"My idea of a true feminist is a woman who feels free enough to do whatever she wants." - Lana Del Rey

I feel like it’s kind of sad that she had to watch that - for Arya and Sansa both, actually. It would seem that they’re bloodthirsty for revenge, you know? But they’re almost just confused as to why they feel how they’re feeling, and they’re surprised by how they’re feeling as well. It’s just that first episode when you get to see how Arya is grieving and how Sansa is grieving. They’re both very similar. A silly audience member will be like, “Oh, look, Sansa’s crying again,” when actually this scene is very interesting. It’s very interesting to hear what she has to say about it and how she deals with it. She’s not crying in pain; it’s a very different Sansa from what we’ve seen before. Same with Arya. She’s not bloodthirsty for revenge. She’s not crazy at all. She’s just like, “Why? Why do I feel the way I do?” People don’t read enough into some of the characters’ decisions, I think. They just think it’s very black and white. It’s never black and white on Game of Thrones. If you think it’s black and white, you’re watching it wrong.

Maisie Williams, being spot fucking on [x] (via maisiewilliams)

The trick, kiddo,” his mom replies slowly. “Is finding someone who complements you instead of completes you. You need to be complete on your own.

The Fight, and Fate by the farofixer  (via supmariss)

(Source: snakegrl1306)

She had stayed a virgin so she wouldn’t be called a tramp or a slut; had married so she wouldn’t be called an old maid; faked orgasms so she wouldn’t be called frigid; had children so she wouldn’t be called barren; had not been a feminist because she didn’t want to be called queer and a man-hater; never nagged or raised her voice so she wouldn’t be called a bitch… She had done all that and yet, still, this stranger had dragged her into the gutter with the names that men call women when they are angry.

Fannie Flagg | Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe (1987) 

(via thefourthwavebegins)

(Source: anuraglahiri)

Marriage equality will, in time, fundamentally destroy “traditional marriage,” and I, for one, will dance on its grave.

It’s not a terribly difficult conclusion to draw.

As same-sex couples marry, they will be forced to re-imagine many tenets of your “traditional marriage.” In doing so, they will face a series of complicated questions:

Should one of us change our last name? And if so, who?

Should we have kids? Do we want to have kids? How do we want to have kids? Whose last name do our kids take?

How about housework, work-work, childcare? How do we assign these roles equitably? How do we cultivate a partnership that honors each of our professional and personal ambitions?

As questions continually arise, heterosexual couples will take notice — and be forced to address how much “traditional marriage” is built on gender roles and perpetuates a nauseating inequality that has no place in 2014.